Faculty Advisory Committee


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Gary Anderson, Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology

Professor Anderson’s interests concern the religion and literature of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible with special focus on the reception of the Bible in early Judaism and Christianity. His interests span the entire Bible, but recently he has put special focus on the book of Genesis as well as priestly literature. He is also interested in biblical narrative, canonical exegesis, biblical theology, Jewish culture and religion, and Jewish-Christian relations.

Anderson has won numerous awards, including, most recently, grants from the American Philosophical Society, the Lilly Endowment, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Hebrew University. His most recent book, Charity: The Place of the Poor in the Biblical Tradition (2013), was named one of the best books in religion in 2013 by Religious News Service, received an award of merit from Christianity Today, and was a finalist for the 2014 American Academy of Religion Awards for Excellence in the Study of Religion. He is currently working on a book on the Tabernacle narratives in Exodus and their influence on the rest of the Bible. Some recent articles include: “Redeem Your Sins by the Giving of Alms: Sin, Debt, and the ‘Treasury of Merit’ in Early Judaism and Christianity,” “To See Where God Dwells: The Tabernacle, the Temple, and the Origins of the Christian Mystical Tradition,” and “The Book of Tobit and the Canonical Ordering of the Book of the Twelve.” Anderson served as vice-president of the Catholic Biblical Association for 2012–13 and president for 2013–14.



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Ann W. Astell, Professor of Theology

Sister Ann is a professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame, where she was appointed in 2007 after serving as a professor of English and chair of Medieval Studies at Purdue University. Her research focuses on medieval literature and spirituality. She is the author of six books, including The Song of Songs in the Middle Ages (1990), Job, Boethius, and Epic Truth (1994), Chaucer and the Universe of Learning (1996), Political Allegory in Late Medieval England (1999), and Joan of Arc and Sacrificial Authorship (2003). The writing of her most recent book, Eating Beauty: The Eucharist and the Spiritual Arts of the Middle Ages (2006), was supported by a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (2001–2002).

Sister Ann is also the editor or co-editor of five volumes on topics related to historical Christian spirituality, including Lay Sanctity, Medieval and Modern: A Search for Models (2000), Joan of Arc and Spirituality (2003, with Bonnie Wheeler), Levinas and Medieval Literature: The “Difficult Reading” of English and Rabbinic Texts (2009, with Justin Jackson), and Sacrifice, Scripture, and Substitution: Readings in Ancient Judaism and Christianity (2011, with Sandor Goodhart). Recent publications include articles in Claritas: Journal of Dialogue and Culture (2014), the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012), Religion and Literature (2011), and Franciscan Studies (2009). A member of the Schoenstatt Sisters of Mary, she has previously served as president of the International Colloquium on Violence and Religion and as president of the Society for the Study of Christian Spirituality.



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Margaret “Peg” Brinig, Fritz Duda Family Chair in Law

Margaret “Peg” Brinig is the quintessential interdisciplinarian, melding her expertise with law and social science in empirical studies of families, social capital, and social welfare legislation. Professor Brinig is best known for her expertise in family law. She sits on the executive council of the International Society of Family Law and recently published Family, Law, and Community: Supporting the Covenant (2010), which offers a distinctive study of legal reform from the perspective of family dynamics and social policy. The book examines a range of subjects of current legal interest, including cohabitation, custody, grandparent visitation, and domestic violence. She concludes that conventional legal systems and the social programs they engender ignore social capital: the trust and support given to families by a community.

Professor Brinig is a fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives at Notre Dame and works closely with the Institute’s Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) Program. She continues to conduct groundbreaking research with colleague Nicole Garnett on the negative impact of Catholic K–12 school closures on poor neighborhoods; their book Lost Classroom, Lost Community: Catholic Schools’ Importance in America was released by the University of Chicago Press in 2014. Brinig has won the Distinguished Professor Award at George Mason University and is a member of the American Law Institute. She was the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture’s 2012–13 Mary Ann Remick Senior Visiting Fellow.


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Susan Collins, Associate Professor of Political Science

Professor Collins specializes in the history of political thought, particularly ancient political philosophy. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Alberta and completed her Ph.D. at Boston College. Her most recent book is a translation, with Robert Bartlett, of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, including notes, glossary, and interpretive essay. It was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2011 and was nominated for the John D. Criticos Prize. Professor Collins is also the author of Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship (2006), co-author and translator of Empire and the Ends of Politics: Plato’s “Menexenus” and Pericles’ Funeral Oration (1999), and co-editor of Action and Contemplation: Studies in the Moral and Political Thought of Aristotle (1999). Her current work focuses on Herodotus and Thucydides, Ancient Sparta, and the regime in Classical thought.

Before joining Notre Dame in the fall of 2013, Collins was the Ross M. Lence Distinguished Teaching Chair at the University of Houston and founding Director of Phronesis: A Program in Politics and Ethics.


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Therese Cory, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Professor Cory’s work focuses on medieval theories of cognition, and in particular on self-consciousness, subjectivity, personal identity, intentionality, and modeling the mind. She is also interested in Arabic influences on thirteenth-century scholastics such as Albert and Aquinas. Her book  Aquinas on Human Self-Knowledge was published in 2013 by Cambridge University Press.

Professor Cory received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the Catholic University of America in 2009. She served as an assistant professor of philosophy at Seattle University from 2010 to 2014 before completing a yearlong postdoctoral fellowship at Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Würzburg, Germany from June 2014 to August 2015. Professor Cory joined the Notre Dame faculty in 2015 as an assistant professor of philosophy.


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Martijn Cremers, Professor of Finance

Professor Cremers' research focuses on empirical issues in investments and corporate governance. His academic work has been published in top academic journals such as the Journal of Finance, the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics, and in newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and numerous others. He is an associate editor at the Review of Finance and was formerly an associate editor at the Review of Financial Studies. Professor Cremers currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Accounting, Finance & Law and European Financial Management.

After obtaining his Ph.D. in Finance from the Stern School of Business at New York University, Professor Cremers served on faculty at the Yale School of Management from 2002 to 2012 before joining Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business as a professor of finance. He earned his undergraduate degree in econometrics from the VU University Amsterdam. 



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William N. Evans, Keough-Hesburgh Chair in Economics

Evans received his Ph.D. in economics in 1987 from Duke University and, for 20 years, was a faculty member in the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland. In 2007, he joined the faculty at Notre Dame as the Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics. His research covers a broad range of areas, including labor economics, public finance, health economics, and the economics of education. Much of his research uses natural and quasi-experimental variation to identify economic relationships. He is currently the editor of the Journal of Human Resources, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a faculty fellow of the Kellogg Institute, and the director of research for the Ford Family Program in Human Development. He and his wife, Eileen, have three boys, Conor (ND, 2012), Brendan (ND, 2015), and Patrick (ND hopeful).



Fr Jim Foster CSC

Fr. James Foster, C.S.C., Associate Dean, College of Science

Fr. Foster directs the Center for Health Sciences Advising and serves as chair of the preprofessional studies program in the College of Science. He closely monitors developments within the health profession admissions process including new schools, course requirements, and curriculum developments. Fr. Foster joined preprofessional studies in 1997 and became chair of the program in 2005.

Fr. Foster earned his Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences from the University of Notre Dame in 1977 and earned his M.D. degree in 1981 from the University of Illinois Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine. He completed his training in Internal Medicine (1984) and Infectious Diseases (1986) at Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Ill. and was board certified in both areas. After several years in private practice, Fr. Foster entered the Congregation of Holy Cross in 1989 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1995. He also completed a Clinical Ethics Fellowship at the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 1997.



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Nicole Stelle Garnett, John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law

Professor Garnett’s teaching and research focus on property, land use, urban development, local government law, and education policy. She is the author of numerous articles on these subjects and of Ordering the City: Land Use, Policing and the Restoration of Urban America (2009). Her latest book, Lost Classroom, Lost Community: Catholic Schools’ Importance in America (2014), chronicles the results of her major empirical research project with Professor Peg Brinig on the effects of Catholic school closures on urban neighborhoods.

At Notre Dame, Professor Garnett is also a fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives and the senior policy coordinator for the Alliance for Catholic Education, a program engaged in a wide array of efforts to strengthen and sustain K–12 Catholic schools. From 2008–10, she served as Provost Fellow at Notre Dame and, during the Spring 2007 semester, as a visiting professor of law at the University of Chicago Law School.

Professor Garnett received her B.A. from Stanford in 1992, where she graduated with honors and distinction in political science. She received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1995. Following graduation from law school, Professor Garnett served as a law clerk for the Honorable Morris S. Arnold of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (1995–96) and for Associate Justice Clarence Thomas of the United States Supreme Court (1998–99). Before joining the law school in 1999, she worked for two years (1996–98) as a staff attorney at the Institute for Justice, a non-profit public-interest law firm in Washington, D.C.



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Brad S. Gregory, Dorothy G. Griffin Professor of Early Modern European History and Director, Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Studies

Brad Gregory is the Dorothy G. Griffin Associate Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Notre Dame. He earned a B.S. in history from Utah State University; a B.A. and licentiate degree in philosophy from the Institute of Philosophy of the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium; an M.A. in history from the University of Arizona; and a Ph.D. in history from Princeton University. Before taking his position at Notre Dame, he was an assistant professor of history at Stanford University and a junior fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows.  

Professor Gregory has received several awards and fellowships, including the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford’s highest teaching honor, and the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford. Gregory is the author of many scholarly articles; his most recent book is The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society (2011). His book Salvation at Stake: Christian Martyrdom in Early Modern Europe won six awards, including the 1999 Thomas J. Wilson Prize as the best first book published by the Harvard University Press and the California Book Award Silver Medal for Nonfiction.



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Patrick GriffinMadden-Hennebry Professor of History and Chair, Department of History

Patrick Griffin is the Madden-Hennebry Professor of History and the chair of the Department of History at the University of Notre Dame, where he specializes in early American history, Atlantic history, and early modern Ireland and Britain. He has published work on the movement of peoples and cultures across the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the process of adaptation. He also examines the ways in which Ireland, Britain, and America were linked—and differed—during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He has looked at revolution and rebellion, movement and migration, and colonization and violence in each society in comparative perspective.

Professor Griffin received his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He is the author of America's Revolution (2012), among other works.


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Rev. Kevin Grove, C.S.C., Residential Fellow, Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Studies

Fr. Kevin Grove is a systematic theologian and a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross. His scholarship focuses on Christology, memory, St. Augustine, and the history and spirituality of Blessed Basil Moreau. He has presented his research in international contexts including England, Belgium, Poland, Malta, France, and the United States, and he has publications forthcoming in presses Ashgate, Brepols, LIT-Verlag, Verlag Friedrich Pustet, and the University of Notre Dame. Fr. Grove is also co-editor of Basil Moreau: Essential Writings (2014).

Fr. Grove received his Ph.D. in Philosophical Theology from the University of Cambridge in 2015. During his studies, he was a member of Trinity College and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, and he also served as the Assistant Roman Catholic Chaplain to the University of Cambridge. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Theology.


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Joseph KaboskiDavid F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics

Professor Kaboski's research focuses on growth, development, and international economics, with an emphasis on structural change, finance and development, schooling and growth, microfinance, international relative price patterns, and the role of inventories in international trade. Professor Kaboski’s work has been published in numerous academic journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Economic Theory, the Journal of Monetary Economics, and the Journal of the European Economic Association. He has consulted for the Federal Reserve Banks of Chicago, Minneapolis, and St. Louis; the World Bank; the International Monetary Fund; and Catholic Relief Services.  He is currently the president of CREDO and a consultant for the USCCB’s Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development. 

Professor Kaboski received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 2001. Before coming to Notre Dame, he served as an assistant and associate professor at the Ohio State University and a visiting professor at the University of Chicago.



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Sean Kelsey, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Graduate Studies

Professor Kelsey received a B.A. from Thomas Aquinas College in 1992 and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton University in 1997. He has taught at Iowa State University, UCLA, and the University of Michigan; he joined the faculty of Notre Dame in 2009. His area of specialization is ancient Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. He is happily married and the proud father of seven children (four daughters and three sons), ages 4 to 20.



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Mary M. Keys, Associate Professor of Political Science

Mary M. Keys holds a B.A. from Boston College and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching interests span a broad spectrum of political theory, with a special focus in Christianity, ethics, and political thought. She is the author of Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good (2006; paperback 2008) and of articles appearing in the American Journal of Political Science, History of Political Thought, and Perspectives on Political Science. She has held various fellowships, including an NEH Fellowship supporting her ongoing research project on “Humility, Modernity, and the Science of Politics,” and she has been a visiting scholar at Harvard University and the University of Chicago.

 



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Mary Ellen Konieczny, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Mary Ellen Konieczny came to Notre Dame in 2008 after working in the sociology department of Concordia University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2005, where her dissertation centered on the topic of “The Spirit’s Tether: Orthodoxy, Liberalism and Family among Contemporary American Catholics.” She also completed her Masters of Divinity from Weston Jesuit School of Theology. Her research interests revolve around the broad themes of religion and family life and religion in American democracy. She is particularly interested in exploring how culture and social processes in local contexts intersect with discourse and politics in the public sphere.

She recently published The Spirit’s Tether: Family, Work, and Religion among American Catholics (2013), a book with Oxford University Press that was developed out of her dissertation study. This ethnography of liberal and conservative Catholic parishes examines the role that religion and family life play in America’s political polarization. Her second book project is a qualitative study of religion at the U.S. Air Force Academy, in which she explores religion in the military and the historical changes in and tensions between the disestablishment of religion and its free exercise.



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Gerald McKenny, Walter Professor of Theology

Professor McKenny teaches and writes on Christian ethics and the ethics of biotechnology. He is the author of To Relieve the Human Condition (1997), a Choice Outstanding Book; The Analogy of Grace: Karl Barth’s Moral Theology (2010); and about thirty-five articles and book chapters in Christian ethics, biomedical ethics, the ethics of biotechnology, religious ethics, and the philosophy of medicine. He is co-editor of three books, including The Ethical (2003) and the two volume work Altering Nature (2008). He is nearing the completion of a book on Christian ethics and biotechnology and has begun work on another book on eschatological political theology.

Prior to coming to Notre Dame in 2001, McKenny taught at Rice University, where he served as chair of the Department of Religious Studies and as co-director of a Ph.D. program in health care ethics linking Rice with the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. At Notre Dame, he served as director of the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values for eight years.



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Francesca Murphy, Professor of Systematic Theology

Professor Murphy was formerly professor of Christian philosophy at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, where she taught from 1995 until 2010. Her major interests are theological aesthetics and ecclesiology. Her books include Christ the Form of Beauty (1995), The Comedy of Revelation (2000), Art and Intellect in the Philosophy of Etienne Gilson (2004), God Is Not a Story: Realism Revisited (2007), and most recently Illuminating Faith: Invitation to Theology (2014) with Balazs Mezei and Kenneth Oakes. Professor Murphy has also edited several volumes, including The Providence of God: Deus Habet Consilium (2009), and translated three books. She is currently editing a book series with Bloomsbury Academic called “Illuminating Modernity.”

 

 


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Rev. Paulinus I. Odozor, C.S.Sp.Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and the Theology of World Church

Fr. Odozor works on foundational issues in moral theology and Christian ethics. He focuses in particular on the history of moral theology, contextual theological issues pertaining to inculturation, African Christian theology, and the theology of marriage. Fr. Odozor’s major publications include Moral Theology in an Age of Renewal: A Study of the Catholic Tradition Since Vatican II and Sexuality, Marriage, and Family: Readings in the Catholic Tradition, published by Notre Dame Press in 2003 and 2001, respectively. His articles have appeared in academic journals in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, and he is currently working on a book exploring morality and tradition form an African Christian theological perspective.

Before coming to Notre Dame in 1999, Fr. Odozor held numerous academic, administrative, and pastoral positions in Nigeria and Canada. He is currently president of the Governing Council of Spiritan International School of Theology in Enugu, Nigeria. He also served as a theological advisor for the Second Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops. 



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Daniel Philpott, Professor of Political Science

Daniel Philpott (Ph.D. Harvard, 1996) pursues interests in international relations, political philosophy, and peace studies. His research focuses on reconciliation in politics. His latest book, Just and Unjust Peace: An Ethic of Political Reconciliation (2012), derives from theological and philosophical roots an ethic of reconciliation that offers concrete guidelines to political orders facing pasts of authoritarianism, civil war, and genocide. On the same topic, Philpott has edited The Politics of Past Evil: Religion, Reconciliation, and Transitional Justice (2006). He also directs a research program on religion and reconciliation at the Kroc Institute.  

Professor Philpott also specializes in religion and global politics. With Monica Duffy Toft and Timothy Samuel Shah, he is author of God’s Century: Resurgent Religion and Global Politics (2011). With Gerard F. Powers, he has also edited Strategies of Peace (2010), a collection of essays on strategic peacebuilding, authored primarily by Kroc Institute faculty. Philpott’s first book was Revolutions in Sovereignty: How Ideas Shaped Modern International Relations (2001). He has also published articles in The American Political Science Review, World Politics, Ethics, The Journal of Democracy, The National Interest, America, Political Studies, The Journal of International Affairs, The Review of Faith and International Affairs, Security Studies, and The Annual Review of Political Science.

Professor Philpott has held fellowships at Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Virginia, the Erasmus Institute at Notre Dame, the Hertie School of Governance, and the Wissenschaftzentrum Berlin, with the latter two on a fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Between 2000 and 2006, he traveled regularly to Kashmir as a senior associate of the International Center for Religion and Diplomacy. He now trains political and religious leaders in reconciliation in Burundi and the broader Great Lakes region of Africa under the auspices of the Catholic Peacebuilding Network.



reynoldsGabriel Said Reynolds, Professor of Islamic Studies and Theology

Gabriel Reynolds' research is focused primarily on the Qur'an and Muslim-Christian relations.  He wrote a dissertation on the remarkable Islamic history of Christianity of ʿAbd al-Jabbar (d. 1025); the dissertation won the Field Prize at Yale and was published as A Muslim Theologian in the Sectarian Milieu (2004). Reynolds also prepared an introduction and translation of this history, published by as The Critique of Christian Origins (2008).

Reynolds’ principal work on the Qurʾan is The Qur'an and Its Biblical Subtext (2010).  He has also publishedThe Emergence of Islam (2012), a work written especially for courses which cover the Qurʾan, the life of the Prophet Muhammad, or the classical period of Islam.

At Notre Dame Professor Reynolds teaches classes including “Foundations of Theology,” “Islam and Christian Theology,” “The Quran and Its Relation to the Bible,” “The Holy Land,” and “Islamic Origins.”  He has also been a visiting professor at Université de Saint Joseph in Lebanon and Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium.  Professor Reynolds has conducted research and delivered lectures in cities throughout the Middle East, including Cairo, Jerusalem, Beirut, Damascus, Ankara, and Tehran. In his spare time he follows Notre Dame football, plays soccer, and watches Bollywood movies.  Prof. Reynolds and his wife Lourdes have four children: Luke, Emmanuel, Theresa, and René.


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Christian Smith, Professor of Sociology and Director, Center for the Study of Religion and Society

Specializing in the sociology of religion and social theory, Christian Smith joined the Notre Dame faculty in 2006, coming from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he served as the Stuart Chapin Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He is the author of several books, including Lost in Transition: The Dark Side of Emerging Adulthood (2011), What Is a Person? Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and Moral Good from the Person Up (2010), Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults (2009) and Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture (2003). What Is a Person?, Souls in Transition, and Soul Searching have received numerous awards and recognition. Smith earned his doctoral and master’s degrees from Harvard University.